BDSM and the Eucharist

“Take eat, this is my body broken for you”

When it comes to intimacy with God, no other act of worship or devotion brings us closer or deeper into contact with the Divine than the Eucharist.

In the Eucharist, or Communion, Christ gives us his broken Body and out poured Blood, to take into our selves and thus join us with his heavenly body in Heaven. By physically taking his Body into ourselves this act takes on a sexual, as well as spiritual dimension.

The sexual act of Eucharist also displays highly fetishistic rituals and behaviours.

First off in the actual act of receiving the Eucharist those present will take the Body and Blood on their knees submissively waiting for their turn with heads bowed and hands outstretched. This submissive act of waiting to receive the Body of God not only reminds us of our place as Submissive to our Heavenly Master, but also highlights the paradox of God being both Dominant and Submissive in the Eucharist.

The Eucharist is the greatest Gift God can give us, however in giving it God is committing a sexual act. By turning the bread and wine to flesh and blood God is submitting intimate parts of Godself for us to consume. It is the ultimate act of physical submission for God to allow the Body and Blood to become present, be broken and out poured and then consumed. In becoming totally submissive God inherits God’s place as the ultimate Dominant, it is through Jesus’ submission on the Cross, and now on the altar, that grants him the place in the Godhead as dominant over humankind.

In submitting Godself, God becomes dominant and allows us to submit more fully and intimately through receiving the physical Body and Blood.

As well as being intimate and sexual, the Eucharist is also violent and physical. The Body and Blood are physically broken and poured out as a sign of Christ’s deep and unlimited submissive love for us. This mirrors the submissive partner surrendering their body to their dominant partner, allowing them to mark, beat and break their bodies and draw blood at will. This requires a deep trust and offers participants an intimacy which is deeper than most. Allowing bodies to be broken and blood out poured is the ultimate sign of submission and not to be entered into lightly. It can be dangerous and should only be practiced by those who have already built up strong and intimate relationships based on trust. These practices change those who participate in them by making them more trusting, loving and willing to share deeply and intimately in the other’s life. The dominant literally leaves their mark on the submissive, both physically but also mentally whilst the dominant receives a deeper love for the submissive and gains their trust.

In breaking God’s Body and pouring out God’s Blood we also engage in a dangerous ritual that should not be entered into lightly, for in doing this we are entering into a greater relationship with God, one that will potentially leave us marked and changed. In breaking the Body and Blood we leave our humanity marked on the very being of God. At the same time in receiving the Body and Blood we grow in love and submission to God through a deeper intimacy.

A final link between the Eucharist and BDSM is the place of remembrance. The Eucharist is performed “in remembrance of me”, to mark the death and resurrection of Christ. In breaking the Body and Blood we remember how Christ’s body was broken on the Cross. This intimate act of worship takes the horrific violence of the Cross and transforms it into an act of outpoured love. BDSM takes the violence and oppression seen in our world and subverts it, transforming them into acts of love and sexual intimacy, often unparalleled for the depth of intimacy they can achieve. Violence, pain and dutiful suffering turned into acts of love and trust. In remembering what happened and reliving it in the Eucharist we are transforming the violence of the past into an act of love which sets us free.

Remembering in a BDSM scene can have the same powerful applications for survivors of sexual assault. There have been many studies done into the positive effects of BDSM and its use in healing trauma. In reliving abusive situations through a scene either through dominating or submitting, victims of assault have been able reclaim their bodies for themselves. BDSM also allows people to build up trust and intimacy with people in ways they thought were lost to them. BDSM also allows people to have sexual experiences with people without having to engage in any “sexual” acts at all. BDSM allows people to engage with their sexuality even if their bodies feel incapable of doing so.

In the same way the intimacy of the BDSM scene allows survivors of sexual assault to over come the violence of the past, reclaim the physicality of their body and create deep intimate relationships with those who were previously distant, the Eucharist allows all of God’s people to make sense of the violence of the Cross, be physical with God’s Body and their own and strengthen the relationship with the totally Divine Other.

Through submissively receiving The Body and Blood of Jesus we are able to enter an intimate and trusting relationship with God in a way that is both physical and spiritual. In re-membering the violence of the Cross as the bread and wine on the altar we transform the violence of this world into acts of love, with all the same healing powers as the whips and chains of the dungeon.

By receiving God’s Body and Blood on our knees with heads bowed and hands stretched out we submit more fully, physically, and intimately to the God who first submitted to us.

 

 

 

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About Natalie Waste

Bisexual, Lifestyle-Submissive CD. Theology student blogging about Kink, Christianity and Theology. kinktheology.wordpress.com
This entry was posted in BDSM, God, Jesus, kink, spirituality, Submission, Suffering, Theology, Worship and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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